MS 61, New College Library, Oxford
Listen to our podcast series of Fellows and Old Members reading short passages of writing that are significant to them.

Readings will be added regularly over the coming weeks, to build into a collection which will remain here for you to enjoy.

In ‘The Fine Art of Reading’, his 1949 inaugural lecture as Goldsmiths’ Professor of English Literature at Oxford, New College Fellow, Lord David Cecil, wrote:

“There are as many different kinds of good books as there are different kinds of good writer.  Each has something to give us.”

Here we invite you to listen to and enjoy some of the many different kinds of writings which our Fellows and Alumni have chosen to read for you. 

 

Hannah Sullivan reads to you

Hannah Sullivan — University of Oxford Associate Professor, New College Fellow, and one of our College’s celebrated poets — reading from ‘The Sandpit after Rain’ from her award-winning debut poetry collection, Three Poems (Faber & Faber, 2018)


 

Daniel Harkin reads to you

New College’s Salvesen Fellow, Daniel Harkin, with a sensitive and thoughtful reading of — and commentary on — ‘The Mower’ by Philip Larkin (1922–1985), written 12 June 1979


 

Miles Young reads to you

Miles Young, Warden of New College, Oxford, delivering the 20th reading in our ‘New College Reads To You’ podcast series with ‘Waiting for the Barbarians’, a poem written in 1898 by C. P. Cavafy (1863–1933) — which he first heard read by John Julius Norwich


 

David Raeburn reads to you

David Raeburn, who taught Classics in schools and at New College for many years, reading from his translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses — about the plague in the Greek island of Aegina . . .


 

Natasha Pulley reads to you

Brilliantly inventive novelist and New College alumna, Natasha Pulley, reading from ‘The Reed-Choked House’, a story she came across while researching for her last book . . . 


 

William Poole reads to you

William Poole — New College’s John Galsworthy Fellow, Senior Tutor, and Fellow Librarian — delivering a perfectly modulated reading from Book IV of Paradise Lost, by John Milton (1608–1674)


 

Karen Leeder reads to you

Karen Leeder, Professor of Modern German Literature, reading from Porcelain: Poem on the Downfall of My City (Seagull Books, 2020), her translation — of Porzellan: Poem vom Untergang meiner Stadt, by German poet, Durs Grünbein (b. 1962) — which is being published 75 years since the Allied firebombing of Dresden


 

Richard Dawkins reads to you

Evolutionary biologist, bestselling author, and New College Emeritus Fellow, Professor Richard Dawkins, reading from his autobiography, Brief Candle in the Dark (2015) — sequel to his An Appetite for Wonder (2013)


 

Andrew Counter reads to you

Andrew Counter — University of Oxford Associate Professor and New College Fellow — reading beautifully a powerful, moving passage from The French Revolution: A History (1837) by Thomas Carlyle, which considers Louis XVI’s final hours as he takes leave of his family


 

Marcus du Sautoy reads to you

Mathematician Marcus du Sautoy, University of Oxford Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and New College Fellow, reading from A Mathematician’s Apology (1940) by G. H. Hardy (1877–1947) — the book that made Marcus want to create his own mathematical stories


 

Kate Mosse reads to you

The fabulous multimillion-selling author — and New College alumna — Kate Mosse, reading from her own bestselling Gothic novel, The Taxidermist’s Daughter, set in 1912 — within the village of Fishbourne, West Sussex, where Kate herself grew up . . .


 

Kate Mosse reads to you

Internationally bestselling writer, founder director of the Women’s Prize for Fiction, first female executive director of the Chichester Festival Theatre — and New College alumna — Kate Mosse, reading from ‘Little Gidding’, the fourth of T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets


 

Patrick Gale reads to you

Bestselling author and New College alumnus, Patrick Gale, reading from his thirteenth novel, The Whole Day Through (2009) — the only time he has yet written about his days at New College . . .


 

Roopa Farooki reads to you

Writer, NHS medic, and alumna of New College, Roopa Farooki, reading ‘The Canonization’ by metaphysical poet and cleric, John Donne (1572–1631), which has hugely influenced her own work


 

Roopa Farooki reads to you

Roopa Farooki — novelist, NHS junior doctor, and New College alumna — reading about New College itself, from her wonderful debut novel, Bitter Sweets (Macmillan, 2007)


 

Stephen Anderson reads to you

New College’s Rodewald Lector in Classical Languages, Stephen Anderson, reading ‘Prayer’ (I) by the devotional poet, George Herbert (1593–1633)


 

Richard Dawkins reads to you

Richard Dawkins, New College Emeritus Fellow and the University of Oxford’s inaugural Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science (1995–2008), reading from Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, from the edition narrated by Richard Dawkins (CSA Word, 2006)


 

Chris Lintott reads to you

New College Research Fellow, University of Oxford Professor of Astrophysics, and the BBC’s “The Sky at Night” presenter, Chris Lintott, reading from Jérôme Lalande’s introduction to Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle’s Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds, translated by Elizabeth Gunning and published in 1803


 

Craig Raine reads to you

Craig Raine — poet, critic, editor, and New College Emeritus Fellow — reading his new poem, ‘Sea Urchins’, based on an Henri Cartier-Bresson photograph of Henri Matisse


 

Steven Balbus reads to you

Steven Balbus, Savilian Professor of Astronomy, reading from Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy (Norton, 1994), by 2017 Physics Nobel Laureate, Kip Thorne 


 

Laura Marcus reads to you

Laura Marcus, Goldsmiths’ Professor of English Literature, reading from Virginia Woolf’s most autobiographical novel, To the Lighthouse (1927) — ‘Time Passes’


 

Patrick Gale reads to you

Patrick Gale, novelist and New College alumnus, reading the hauntingly enigmatic ‘Angel Hill’ from Collected Poems 1951–2000 (Macmillan, 2000) by Cornish poet, Charles Causley (1917–2003)

 

Subscribe to New College’s YouTube channel for all readings from our ‘New College Reads To You’ podcast series, and for more New College, Oxford videos.


Acknowledgements:

Video by Christopher Thompson — Photos of New College by Michael Burden and Erica Longfellow
Produced by Sam Brown, Erica Longfellow, and Christopher Skelton-Foord


 

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